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» Conférences d’après mars 2011 : nouveau site

2125

Colloque "Le déni de l’Holocauste" / "Holocauste Denial" Conference

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Session III "Denial: The Private and the Public"
Debórah Dwork (Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Clark Univ.), Alexandra Garbarini (Dept. of History, Williams College) et Jan Gross (Dept. of History, Princeton Univ.)

14 novembre 2008

Programm of this session (chair: Samuel Moyn, Department of History, Columbia University):
– lecture by Debórah Dwork,
– lecture by Alexandra Garbarini,
– lecture by Jan Gross,
– overall discussion on Denial: The Private and the Public.

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Debórah Dwork Debórah Dwork (Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Clark Univ.)
Debórah Dwork is the Rose Professor of Holocaust History and Director of the Strassler Family Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. As the founding Director of the Center, she has given shape to a forum for Holocaust and genocide education and scholarship, dedicated to teaching, research, and public service. Her books include Children With A Star, translated into many languages and the subject of a documentary by the CBC. Auschwitz, co-authored with Robert Jan van Pelt, received the National Jewish Book Award, the Spiro Kostoff Award, and was voted Best Book by the German Book Critics. It was the basis for the Emmy-nominee BBC documentary, Auschwitz: The Blueprints of Genocide. Holocaust: A History, again in collaboration with van Pelt and also translated into a number of languages, was a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award. Her most recent book, The Terezin Album of Marianka Zadikow, is an annotated, edited poesie album collected by a Jewish inmate as the Germans pressed forward with deportations from Theresienstadt. A new work, The Refugees’ Globe: Jews in Search of Safety (in press, to be published by W.W. Norton in April 2009), coauthored with van Pelt, focuses on the ever dwindling choices open to refugees, and the often painful decisions of the many people who dealt with them – consuls; immigration officers and other government officials; church, health, and social workers; volunteers; private individuals. It is a story with which the authors have personal connection: both are related by friendship and kinship to many people who left Nazi Europe as refugees, and to a few who had the opportunity to flee, chose to remain, and survived.
Debórah Dwork has been, inter alia, a Guggenheim Fellow, a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and a Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies. She serves on many advisory boards, and works with numerous non-profit organizations and foundations concerned with Holocaust education.

Alexandra Garbarini Alexandra Garbarini (Dept. of History, Williams College)
Alexandra Garbarini was a student of Saul Friedländer at UCLA, from which she received her PhD in 2003. Her first book, Numbered Days: Diary Writing and the Holocaust (Yale University Press, 2006), was a runner-up for the National Jewish Book Award, Holocaust category. She is currently at work on a study of two 1920s murder trials and what they reveal about European attitudes toward mass atrocity, the rights of minority groups, and the responsibility of Western powers during the pre-Holocaust years. She teaches in the history department of Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts.

Jan Gross Jan Gross (Dept. of History, Princeton Univ.)
Jan Gross is the Norman B. Tomlinson ‘16 and ‘48 Professor of War and Society at Princeton University. He studies modern Europe, focusing on comparative politics, totalitarian and authoritarian regimes, Soviet and East European politics, and the Holocaust. After growing up in Poland and attending Warsaw University, he immigrated to the United States in 1969 and earned a Ph.D. in sociology from Yale University (1975). His first book, Polish Society under German Occupation, appeared in 1979. Revolution from Abroad (1988) analyzes how the Soviet regime was imposed in Poland and the Baltic states between 1939 and 1941. Neighbors (2001), which was a finalist for the National Book Award, reconstructs the events that took place in July 1941 in the small Polish town of Jedwabne, where virtually every one of the town’s 1,600 Jewish residents was killed in a single day. Using eyewitness testimony Professor Gross demonstrates that the Jews of Jedwabne were murdered by their Polish neighbors, not by the German occupiers, as previously assumed. The shocking story occasioned an unprecedented reevaluation of Jewish-Polish relations during World War II and touched off passionate debate. In 2004 many of the Polish voices in this debate were published in translation in a collection, The Neighbors Respond. He joined the Princeton History Department in 2003 after teaching at New York University, Emory, Yale, and universities in Paris, Vienna, and Krakow.

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